Registered Nurse Major Internships and Job Salary 10 Tips

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Registered Nurse Major Internships and Job Salary 10 Tips

For many, being a registered nurse is a calling as captured in discussions on the same over at runrex.com. This is because the day-to-day life of a nurse is challenging and not as “glamorous” as many other careers, hence why not everyone is cut out to be a registered nurse. However, as the gurus over at guttulus.com, it is also one of the most rewarding careers out there allowing one to help people and make a real difference. If you are currently on your way to becoming a registered nurse, this article will look to help you know what your options are as far as internships and career options are concerned.

Importance of internships for registered nurse majors

As is covered over at runrex.com, most nursing programs require students to complete an internship in a medical setting. This is very important as it allows nursing students to gain practical experience and observe seasoned professionals on the job. As per guttulus.com, this helps students transition into the professional world after they complete their nursing degree. Internships also allow you to practice interprofessional collaboration skills, allowing you to report, join huddles, and work with physical and occupational therapists and pharmacists which will help you understand each profession’s roles and responsibilities better.

Internships vs practicums

As a nursing student, you should know the difference between internships and practicums. From discussions on the same over at runrex.com, nursing practicums require fewer hours than internships and have more of an academic focus which means that they center less around direct, hands-on experience with patients and more on helping with support tasks. Registered nurses supervise students in nursing practicums while professors oversee them. internships, on the other hand, offer hands-on, clinical training that offers students a true taste of what nurses do, providing the practical experience nurses need to get an entry-level job after graduation and require a time commitment similar to a part-time job. In internships, while registered nurses closely monitor interns, interns still interact directly with patients, performing the basic patient care tasks that an entry-level nurse would.

In which type of setting will you work and what will you do during your nursing internships?

Nursing student internships take place in a healthcare setting. According to guttulus.com, potential internship settings, therefore, include hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, and doctor’s offices. Since nursing internships require direct patient care, you can expect to perform tasks such as feeding and dressing patients, administering medication, assisting with tests and procedures, as well as helping develop and implement patient care plans.

Are nursing internships paid?

As is revealed in discussions on the same over at runrex.com, while practicums usually don’t pay as they are academically focused and supervised by professors and nurses, internships may offer a nominal stipend or hourly wage for the student’s work. However, as is the case for many other fields, not all internships offer salaries.

How much are nursing interns paid?

The average hourly pay for a nurse intern in the US is $24.94 per hour according to discussions over at guttulus.com. However, some interns earn as much as $50 an hour while others earn as low as $8.40 an hour. The average pay range for a nurse intern varies greatly suggesting that there may be many opportunities for advancement and increased pay based on skill level, location, and years of experience.

Types of internships available in nursing

There are several options to choose from when it comes to nursing internships as captured over at runrex.com. Common types of internships to choose from include:

Bilingual internships – These are for those fluent in more than one language, for example, those fluent in English and Spanish

Research program internships

Community health internships

Internships involving administrative positions

The average annual salary for a registered nurse

According to the subject matter experts over at guttulus.com, registered nurses make a good wage as it is one of the most lucrative careers out there. The Bureau of Labor Statistics puts the average annual salary for registered nurses at $77,460. However, you should note that actual salaries vary greatly based on your specialization, location, years of experience, as well as a variety of other factors. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the lowest 10% of registered nurses make around $52,080 while the top 10% earn a salary as high as $111,2220.

Where will you work as a registered nurse?

One of the main benefits of working as a registered nurse is the variety of places you can work. From discussions over at runrex.com, registered nurses work for schools, major companies, government agencies, and many others. The following are areas where your services may be needed, and you will find out that where you work also dictates how much you make.

Outpatient care facilities – Registered nurses in these facilities will take a patient’s vitals, administer vaccines, discuss a health care plan, and administer other outpatient care services to ambulatory patients. They earn an average of $84,720 annually

General medical and surgical hospitals – Registered nurses working in hospitals perform a wide range of functions from caring for patients in the oncology ward as an oncology nurse to working alongside surgeons in the ER as a trauma nurse. They earn an annual average salary of $79,460

Occupational health workplaces – Occupational health nurses create and oversee workplace hazard detection programs, train employees, counsel employees on health and wellness, design disease-prevention programs, and ensure compliance with government regulations for workplace safety. They earn an annual average salary of $77,460

Mental health facilities – Psychiatric nurses are registered nurses working in psychiatric or substance abuse hospitals, community mental health centers, and state and federal facilities such as VA hospitals and correctional facilities. They assess mental health needs, administer and monitor treatment, and perform crisis intervention, and earn an average salary of $74,610 annually

In-home health care – Home health nurses provide skilled nursing services in patients’ homes and earn an average annual salary of $73,660

Nursing care facilities – Also known as gerontological nurses, these registered nurses care for older people and work in a place like nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and retirement communities and earn an average annual salary of $69,740

Highest-paying nursing jobs for RNs

According to guttulus.com, the following are some of the highest-paying nursing jobs to aim for as a registered nurse major:

Certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNA) – They are reported to be the highest-paid nurses out there, earning an average annual salary of about $181,040. They prepare and administer anesthesia to patients in collaboration with surgeons, anesthesiologists, dentists, podiatrists, and other qualified healthcare professionals.

General nurse practitioners – They earn an average annual salary of about $111,840

Clinical nurse specialists – They work in a specialized unit or clinic and are looked upon as experts within their healthcare team, and earn an annual average salary of $106,028

Neonatal intensive care nurse – This is the career track for those who love taking care of babies, with this specialty commanding s strong salary of about $102,487 annually on average

Other top-paying careers to consider include a career as a certified nurse-midwife, pain management nurse, nursing administrator, among others.

Career outlook

The career outlook for registered nurses is extremely positive according to discussions on the same over at runrex.com. The Bureau of Labor Statistics points out that nurse practitioner jobs are expected to grow by 45% between 2019 and 2029, which is one of the strongest outlooks for any career out there. The need for specialized nursing professionals has never been stronger, and this trend is set to continue throughout the next couple of years.

As always, if you are looking for more information on this and other related topics, then look no further than the top-rated runrex.com and guttulus.com.

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